Boom Trucks

Literally a growing phenomenon in the crane market. boom trucks have reached higher capacities than ever before. Currently reaching lifting capacities up to 55 tons, boom trucks have boom lengths up to 200 feet. Capacity of the crane depends on the boom length and lifting radius chart provided by the manufacturer. Please check with the OEM and load chart before lifting any heavy materials.

Boom trucks come with a variety of options. Models may come with or without a cab. A riding seat that is mounted to the base of the boom may also be used, enabling the operator to physically ride with the boom as it places a load. Another operational feature that may be included is a wireless radio remote control. This control enables crane operators to stand clear of the load and any dangers on the site, or they may follow the crane as the unit places the load.

Features worth noting on boom trucks include non-slip deck surfaces, outriggers, a truck cab and chassis, multiple axles, hydraulic cylinders, hydraulic hoses, load moment indicators, controls, winches, and wire rope. Rigging gear such as slings, wire rope, hooks, and blocks and lifting devices like hardware and winches also must be used to
safely lift loads by the boom truck.

Other names for boom trucks include taxi crane and truck-mounted crane, as they are engineered on a chassis selected by the crane owner. Although many boom trucks are owned by private owners, some have been acquired by rental companies who rent these cranes without an operator. Today, rental companies must be aware that crane operators, including operators of boom trucks, are required by the Occupational Safety & Health Administration to carry a crane operators license in the United States. Many Canadian provinces require operators to be licensed.

Key manufacturers include National Crane, Tadano, Manitex, Altec, Terex, Elliott Equipment, and QMC
 

Search the Crane Hot Line used cranes database for used boom trucks.