Crane and Rigging

Crane and rigging gear is used together in order to perform lifts by mobile and overhead cranes. All makes and models of cranes require rigging gear, which includes slings, winches, wire rope, and lifting devices and hardware. Crane and rigging manufacturers are usually not the same companies. Instead, they work together to provide owners and operators with the safest and most efficient ways to make heavy lifts on construction and industrial jobsites.

A key focus of the crane and rigging industry is inspection and maintenance of equipment. Sunlight, overuse, and improper use of equipment may affect this equipment, which will require rigging gear and lifting devices to be inspected frequently (see the ASME B30 standards and OSHA regulations for details) and replaced as necessary. Over the years, manufacturers have made inspections easier by adding the information to the sling tag and using clear sling covers to view the sling's interior for inspection.

A number of associations in North America serve crane and rigging professionals, including the Specialized Carriers & Rigging Association, or SC&RA, and the Association of Crane & Rigging Professionals, or ACRP. These associations often focus on safety, insurance, licensing, business management, and lift planning that is required by crane and rigging professionals.

In 2010 the Occupational Safety & Health Administration passed a crane regulation that acquires both crane and rigging professionals, such as operators and riggers, to pass an exam to become a certified. Among the changes, OSHA now requires truck crane operators to carry a license to operate a crane in North America. Many Canadian provinces also require operators to be licensed. Several organizations, including CIC, NACB, and NCCCO, can provide crane and rigging classes in order for these professionals to complete their certification. These many include a written and practical exams in order to receive the licenses.